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10 Tips for Becoming a Better Archer

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Do You Use These Tips?

Archery is a long-standing tradition in North America. From the bows Native Americans used, to the early models crafted by Fred Bear, to the top-end compound bows we shoot today, we enjoy a rich history of stick and string.

Because of that history, and the fact archery is so fun, people are getting on board with the sport at record rates. A lot of people are getting into archery. If you’re one of them, check out these 10 tips. I’m sure they’ll help improve your archery accuracy.

Buy the Best Gear You Can Afford

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Image 1 of 10

1 | Buy the Best Gear You Can Afford

I’m not made of money. Chances are neither are you. That said, it’s important to buy the best archery gear that you can afford. Not all, but much of the higher end products do perform better. It might seem simple and superficial, but buying better products will help improve your accuracy.

Tune Your Bow and Don’t Sacrifice Accuracy for Speed

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Image 2 of 10

2 | Tune Your Bow and Don’t Sacrifice Accuracy for Speed

Bow tuning is crucial for success. Paper, French and other methods of tuning are all great ways to improve your bow’s accuracy. Arrows will fly straighter and truer and you’ll be much happier with your overall performance.

It’s also important to not sacrifice accuracy for speed. It’s better to shoot a little slower bow that’s more accurate than a burner that can’t hit a pie plate at 10 yards. Keep that in mind when buying equipment and setting up a bow.

Breathe, Relax and Aim Small

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3 | Breathe, Relax and Aim Small

Properly controlling your breathing is very important for improving overall archery accuracy. Take calm, deep breaths in and out as you draw your bow. Then slow your breathing down and momentarily halt inhaling and exhaling as you loose the arrow. Remember, aim small. Don’t aim for the target. Aim for the crack in the paint on the bullseye on the target. Aim small, miss small.

Shorten the Release and Let It Surprise You

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4 | Shorten the Release and Let It Surprise You

You don’t want to be pulling the release with the tip of your finger. You don’t want to choke it way up on your finger either. Find a happy medium by adjusting the length of the release. This will help prevent you from pulling your shot.

It’s also important — if you’re having trouble with accuracy — to let the shot surprise you much like when shooting a rifle. This will help prevent target panic and will lead to better performance.

Perfect Your Form and Stance

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Image 5 of 10

5 | Perfect Your Form and Stance

Start by spreading your feet about shoulder width. Stand so your slightly opened up toward the target. Keep your torso straight. Don’t lean forward or backward. And keep your chest up, not slumped.

Use Helpful Gear

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Image 6 of 10

6 | Use Helpful Gear

Take advantage of technology. Use the bubble level to make sure the bow isn’t tilted. Activate lighted pins in low-light conditions. Utilize any other features your gear offers. It’s there for a reason and it’ll make you a better shot.

Have an Open Grip

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Image 7 of 10

7 | Have an Open Grip

Don’t grip the bow handle. Once you’ve drawn the bow, keep your grip on the handle open and loose. Allow the grip to seat comfortably in the curve of your palm. Doing so will reduce torque and improve accuracy.

Maintain Your Anchor Point and Use a Peep Sight and Kisser Button

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8 | Maintain Your Anchor Point and Use a Peep Sight and Kisser Button

Archery is all about muscle memory. The best thing you can do to improve accuracy is to maintain the same anchor point each time you shoot. Choose three or more “contact points” within your anchor point so you know you’re doing it the same each time. Also, use a peep sight and kisser button. These two things will make a world of difference, too.

Photo credit: Craig Watson photo

Float the Shot and Execute a Solid Follow-Through

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Image 9 of 10

9 | Float the Shot and Execute a Solid Follow-Through

Don’t aim the bow. Float the pin until you’re on target. Then, as the pin floats over the bullseye, squeeze the shot off. Keep the pin on target until the arrow has impacted it. Finish with a solid follow-through. If you’re shooting form is correct, the bow should slowly tip straight forward once the arrow leaves the bow.

Practice Smart, Not Hard

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Image 10 of 10

10 | Practice Smart, Not Hard

Don’t go out and shoot 300 arrows every day. Go out and shoot five to 10 arrows each afternoon. Focus on your form and make each one count. After all, you usually only get one shot in the moment of truth.

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