12 Facts About Pronghorns

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Have You Ever Hunted Pronghorn?

A Common Sight

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1 | A Common Sight

Fact: Pronghorns are a common sight in the plains and arid regions of the American West.

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Among Us

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2 | Among Us

Fact: Pronghorns are native to North America and found nowhere else in the world.

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The Antilocapra Family

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3 | The Antilocapra Family

Fact: Pronghorns aren’t true antelope — they’re the only member of the family Antilocapra. 

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Horns

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4 | Horns

Fact: Both male and female pronghorns have true horns, but the female's horns are typically just tiny spikes.

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Shedding

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5 | Shedding

Fact: Pronghorns are the only species of animal that sheds its horns yearly.

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Dogging

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6 | Dogging

Fact: Pronghorns are the fastest land mammal in North America.

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Now That

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7 | Now That's Fast

Fact: They can run at speeds of up to 60 miles per hour.

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Rise and Shine

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8 | Rise and Shine

Fact: Young pronghorns are born in late spring.

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Peek-a-Boo

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9 | Peek-a-Boo

Fact: Fawns weigh 5 to 6 pounds at birth.

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The Herd

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10 | The Herd

Fact: Most pronghorns give birth to twins.

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The Hunted

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11 | The Hunted

Fact: Pronghorns are a popular species among western hunters.

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On the Hunt

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12 | On the Hunt

Fact: Bowhunters have the best success over watering holes, but spot-and-stalk and decoy hunting are also effective.

Editor's note: This was originally published in 2010.

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These pronghorn antelope pictures celebrate a unique North American big-game animal.