DIY Archery Emergency Kit

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Necessary Tools of the Trade

Allen Wrench Set

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1 | Allen Wrench Set

Allen wrenches are standard issue equipment when it comes to working on archery gear. Having a set on-hand during a hunt can resolve a lot of minor issues quickly.

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D-loop Material

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2 | D-loop Material

Loops can break unexpectedly and without one your hunt can come to screeching halt. Having a section of loop material in your archery first-aid kit is a must.

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Kisser Button

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3 | Kisser Button

Anything that’s attached to the bowstring is susceptible to becoming removed from that string. Having extra string accessories on hand is important. Especially kisser buttons, these little anchor point references are notorious for flying off with no warning, keep a couple extra in your kit just in case. 

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Lighter

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4 | Lighter

A lighter is another extremely useful tool when it comes to archery set up and maintenance. They can be used to burn the ends of a d-loop, finish a section or serving, heat-up and index an arrow inset and the list goes on. You can pick one up at any convenience store if you’re in a bind but when hunting far from civilization, having a couple on hand is never a bad idea. 

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Nocks

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5 | Nocks

Something so small and simple, yet without them firing an arrow is impossible. Nocks are easy to bust when on a hunt but they’re also cheap, so keep a few extra in your kit and you’ll be prepared for the worst. 

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Peep Sight

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6 | Peep Sight

If served into the bow string correctly there shouldn’t be much concern with a peep sight flying out while shooting. Then again, there’s that old law named after some Murphy fella. Add an extra peep sight to your kit and learn how to serve it in just in case.

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Portable Bow Press

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7 | Portable Bow Press

Should a major issue arise, a bow press may be required to get things back in order. Portable presses are an excellent option for archery repair on the go. Be sure to check with your bow’s manufacturer before using a portable press. 

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Serving

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8 | Serving

Nearly all string accessories are secured with this material. Taking a small spool on an archery hunt is a smart move.

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String Silencers

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9 | String Silencers

These small rubber dampeners help to reduce noise from the bow string. They also have a habit of waiting until you’re on a hunt to break. Toss a couple extra in your kit and you’ll be back up and hunting in no time. 

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String Wax

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10 | String Wax

Of all the things in this archery first-aid kit, string wax is the only measure of preventative maintenance. String fibers dry over time but applying a bit of string wax regularly will help keep them in top shape and make them last much longer. 

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Archery Multi-Tool

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11 | Archery Multi-Tool

These tools make nearly any repair job involving string accessories easier. They function as nock pliers, a d-loop stretch and spreader as well as a useful tool around camp.

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Loop and Serving Combo

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12 | Loop and Serving Combo

The last item in this archery first-aid kit incorporates two items we’ve already discussed. Attaching a pre-measured and pre-burned section of d-loop material to the bow riser or quiver bracket with a long section of serving material makes a true in-the-field repair kit. 

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It doesn’t matter if you’re hunting 10 minutes from home or 10 miles from the trailhead. If you spend enough time in the field as a bowhunter you’ll encounter an equipment issue. Having these basic archery tools and accessories at the ready can spell the difference between success and a busted hunt.

Editor's Note: This was originally published March 9, 2017.

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