12 Things Your Deer Hunting Camp Emergency Kit Should Include

What Do You Have in Yours?

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1 | The Box

A large, metal military surplus ammo box is the perfect container for your emergency kit. They are waterproof, tough as nails, and not very expensive.

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Photo credit: Heartland Bowhunter

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2 | First-Aid Kit

Don’t skimp on this one. Buy a good first-aid kit with plenty of bandages, gauze, disinfectant, wound-closure strips and anti-biotic ointment. An Ace bandage comes in handy for wrapping sprains and holding bandages in place. 

Photo credit: Michael Pendley

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3 | Over-the-Counter Meds

Let’s face it — packing treestands, climbing trees and dragging deer use muscles most of us don’t activate every day. Aches and pains are a sure result. Keep a bottle of your favorite pain reliever/inflammation reducer. Deer-camp diets can wreak havoc on a digestive system. Anti-diarrheal, Pepto Bismol and a laxative are good items to pack along to keep you out of camp and in the field. If you suffer from allergies, make sure you include an allergy reducer of some sort, too. 

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Photo credit: Michael Pendley

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4 | Tarp

An 8-feet by 10-feet tarp has a ton of uses in camp. Make an extra shelter for gear when it rains. Shield the fire from a blowing pour-down. Use it as a makeshift deer drag to make that haul back to camp easier. Or, find a million other ways to use a tarp in camp.

Photo credit: Michael Pendley

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5 | Tools

Mechanical things break down — usually at the worst possible time. Pack along a few basic tools in case you need to work on something around camp. Bowhunting? Pack along a field-style bow press and any tools and wrenches you might need to make minor repairs on your bow in camp. A pre-stretched backup bowstring is also a good idea. There are very few problems in the world that can’t be remedied with either Duck Tape or WD-40. Pack both.

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Photo credit: Michael Pendley

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6 | Water Purification

Just in case you get stuck in the backcountry longer than expected, a backup water source is a must-have. You can use a straw-type filter, or pack along some purification tablets. It’s your choice. Just make sure you have a way to make the water you find afield safely drinkable.

Photo credit: Heartland Bowhunter

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7 | Bleach

A small jug of bleach comes in handy around camp. Use eight drops in a gallon of water to purify it. Add a tablespoon to that same gallon and you have a disinfectant for cleaning up around camp. Keeping things clean keeps everyone healthy.

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Photo credit: Michael Pendley

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8 | Rope

The uses for rope and string around camp are too numerous to list. Pack some thinner stuff for suspending tarps and heavier rope for suspending deer or building a makeshift shelter.

Photo credit: Michael Pendley

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9 | Knife and Hatchet

Pack both a heavy, bladed knife and a hatchet in your kit. They will come in handy for sure. Cut firewood. Cut poles for game or gear hanging. Build a makeshift shelter if something happens to your tent. Or field dress and breaking down large game with them.

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Photo credit: Michael Pendley

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10 | LED Lantern and Extra Flashlights

Being able to see in the dark comes in handy. Even though everyone in camp probably has a light with them, keep a few extras. Also, stock the appropriate batteries in your kit.

Photo credit: Michael Pendley

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11 | Canned Food

A few extra days in camp due to weather or mechanical breakdowns isn’t a big deal as long as you have food and water. In a perfect world, there will be plenty of game to keep everyone fed. Just in case, pack along a few cans of Spam or beef stew to keep the hunger at bay. 

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Photo credit: Michael Pendley

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12 | Fire Starter

Pack a couple extra lighters or a box of waterproof matches. This is a very important component of a complete camp safety kit.

Photo credit: Michael Pendley

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In a perfect world, everything runs smoothly and nothing happens that might take away from a fun time at camp. But we all know the world isn’t perfect. Packing a camp emergency kit lets you deal with any minor problems that might pop up, keeping you in camp and having fun. Here are 12 things (and more) to include in your kit.

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