7 Weird Whitetail Oddities

It Doesn't Get Any Weirder Than This In the World of Whitetails

By author of Brow Tines and Backstrap
Albino Deer

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1 | Albino Deer

These are likely the most recognized on the list. Practically everyone has heard of the infamous white deer we all love to see. Some states allow hunters to shoot them. Other states don’t. Does yours?

Photo credit: Courtesy of Mike Crowley/NorthernWisconsin.com

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Piebald Deer

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2 | Piebald Deer

Like the albino, this is another genetic-based color phase for deer. And also like the albino, some states allow the hunting of these rare oddities, and some do not. The piebald is more common than both albino and melanistic (not pictured in this gallery) deer. 

Photo credit: Bruce MacQueen/Shutterstock

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Bullwinkle Deer

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3 | Bullwinkle Deer

Ah, we come to the Bullwinkle phenomenon. Actually, it isn’t a phenomenon at all. Instead it’s a very unfortunate situation for the deer that suffer from this ailment. As of right now, we know very little of this condition. It seems to be triggered by long-term inflammation of the mouth and nasal region. Very few cases of this have been found, ranging from Alabama to Michigan and places in-between. 

Photo credit: Courtesy of QDMA

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Dwarf Deer

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4 | Dwarf Deer

Just like it happens within the human race, it happens with deer. Thus we call them dwarf deer. Notice how much smaller the buck on the right is from the buck on the left. Indications show both of these are yearling bucks.

Photo credit: Bill Wheeler

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Cactus Bucks

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5 | Cactus Bucks

This oddity is where a buck grows thick, gnarly antlers that do not shed. This generally happens when a buck receives a serious injury to the testicular region or with bucks born without them. Extremely low levels of testosterone prevent the shedding of antlers.

Read the full story of this cactus buck here.

Photo credit: Courtesy of Casey Burnett

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Doppelkopf Antlers

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6 | Doppelkopf Antlers

Now we’re really getting weird. These deer will grow one new antler each year, but generally do not shed but one side. Notice this buck with one antler in velvet and the other out of velvet.

Read the full story of this deer here.

Photo credit: Courtesy of QDMA

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Antlered Does

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7 | Antlered Does

This doe has antlers. Just like hen turkeys can have beards, does can have antlers. It’s rare. But it happens. Have you or someone you know ever seen or tagged an antlered doe? Comment below if you have.

Read the full story of this antlered doe here.

Photo credit: Courtesy of Carl Doron

Editor's Note: This was originally published April 1, 2017.

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There are a lot of weird things that occur in the world of whitetails. That goes without saying. But I’m willing to bet that there are some occurrences that many of you may have never heard of before. Here are seven. Ever seen any of these in the wild?