The 6 World Record Mule Deer By Subspecies

By author of Brow Tines and Backstrap

Can You Name Each of These Bucks?

The Record Typical Mule Deer

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1 | The Record Typical Mule Deer

Hunter: Doug Burris, Jr.

Location Killed: Dolores County, Colorado

Date Killed: 1972

Score: 226 4/8 Inches

This is an iconic mule deer, no doubt. Taken in 1972, it’s held the record for 46 years. Records aren’t easy to break. But rarely do they hold on that long. This is a brute.

This buck has it all. The main beams are 30 1/8 inches (right) and 28 6/8 inches (left). The inside spread is 30 7/8 inches. It sports six points on the right side and five points on the left. It’s a true giant.

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Photo credit: Boone and Crockett

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The Record Non-Typical Mule Deer

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2 | The Record Non-Typical Mule Deer

Hunter: Ed Broder

Location Killed: Chip Lake, Alberta

Date Killed: 1926

Score: 355 2/8 Inches

We thought the typical record has held its own for a long time. Check out the non-typical world record. It was taken all the way back in 1926 and there still hasn’t been a buck to dethrone it. That’s truly legendary.

This buck has a 26 2/8-inch main beam on the right and a 26 1/8-inch main beam on the left. It has a 22 1/8-inch inside spread and sports a total of 43 scoreable points. This is a giant mule deer. A stud. Learn even more about it in the link below.

Don’t Miss: The Broder Buck: The World Record Non-Typical Mule Deer

Photo credit: Boone and Crockett

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The Record Typical Columbia Blacktail Deer

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3 | The Record Typical Columbia Blacktail Deer

Hunter: Lester H. Miller

Location Killed: Lewis County, Washington

Date Killed: 1953

Score: 182 2/8 Inches

Like a big blacktail? This buck is just that. It was taken in 1953 and it doesn’t seem like that record will be broken anytime soon. Lester Miller’s 5x5 buck is a world record in its own right.

This buck sports an inside spread of 20 2/8 inches. The right main beam is 24 2/8 inches and the left beam is 24 5/8. This deer exceeds all expectations of what a typical blacktail deer should look like.

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Photo credit: Boone and Crockett

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The Record Non-Typical Columbia Blacktail Deer

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4 | The Record Non-Typical Columbia Blacktail Deer

Hunter: Frank S. Foldi

Location Killed: Polk County, Oregon

Date Killed: 1962

Score: 208 1/8 Inches

This is a beautiful buck. And honestly, it looks more like a giant non-typical whitetail rack than a Columbia blacktail one. It’s a giant and an incredible representation of the species.

This particular deer doesn’t have a super-wide spread (relatively speaking), coming in at 17 5/8 inches. But it does have pretty long beams at 21 7/8 inches (right) and 20 4/8 inches (left). It also has nine impressive scoreable points on each side.

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Photo credit: Boone and Crockett

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The Record Typical Sitka Blacktail

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5 | The Record Typical Sitka Blacktail

Hunter: Peter Bond

Location Killed: Juskatla, British Columbia

Date Killed: 1970

Score: 133 Inches

Noticing a trend? All six of these records have held up for at least 30 years. Most of them have done so for much longer. That’s pretty wild. And it’s rare. In today’s age of trophy management (for many species), records don’t last as long as they once did. But the old-time mulies are still representing.

This buck boasts a 19 6/8-inch inside spread. It also has long main beams with 20 2/8 inches on the right side and 19 4/8 inches on the left. It has 10 scoreable points.

Don’t Miss: How to Bowhunt for Blacktails

Photo credit: Boone and Crockett

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The Record Non-Typical Sitka Blacktail

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6 | The Record Non-Typical Sitka Blacktail

Hunter: William B. Steele, Jr.

Location Killed: Control Lake, Alaska

Date Killed: 1987

Score: 134 Inches

Like non-typical Sitkas? This buck is a beauty. It actually appears smaller than the typical record, but it isn’t. It outscores the Bond buck by an inch. The non-typical genetics just aren’t that prominent in this subspecies. They most often exhibit very typical-like frames.

This deer, the smallest of the three subspecies, has a 16 3/8-inch inside spread. It also has a 19 6/8-inch right main beam and a 20 3/8-inch left main beam. The buck has 11 scoreable points.

Don’t Miss: How to Hunt the Sitka Blacktail

Photo credit: Boone and Crockett

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Want More Records?

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Mule deer are loved by many, but hunted by few when compared to the more popular whitetail deer. But the western cousin still draws a lot of hunters to the woods each season. And between the three subspecies, their kind has a modern cult following that herald them above all other animals.

Here are the six world record mule deer by subspecies and all the information you need to know about them.

Editor’s Note: Only deer entered into the Boone and Crockett records database were considered for this article. There is some debate on the classification of blacktail under mule deer. That said, Boone and Crockett recognizes it as such and has therefore been grouped in such a manner for this post.