10 Food Plot Seed Options for 2017

Do You Plan to Plant Food Plots This Year?

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7 Card Stud

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1 | 7 Card Stud

This is the blend of blends. From forage oats to Daikon radishes, it has just about everything you’d want in it. This blend includes early, mid- and late-season food sources.

Seed Contents: Forage triticale, crimson clover, forage oats, winter peas, forage turnips, Daikon radishes and forage chicory

Coverage Area: ¼ acre

Price: $19.99

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AlphaPlot

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2 | AlphaPlot

This has both perennial and annual forages. This blend is high in protein. Not only that but it’s also very palatable (digestible) for deer. This is a drought- and heat-tolerant blend, which makes it very good for southern regions and other dry climates.

Seed Contents: Clover, chicory, t-raptor and alfalfa

Coverage Area: 1/3 acre

Price: $24.99

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Buck’n Oats

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3 | Buck’n Oats

Oats have long been a food-plot favorite for whitetails. This is a great food plot choice for colder regions. Plant this in the spring or fall. It’s a fast-growing blend.

Seed Contents: Forage oats and forage chicory

Coverage Area: ¼ acre

Price: $24.99

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EasyPlot

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4 | EasyPlot

This is the master blend of green food plots. Although good seed-to-soil contact is needed, heavy equipment isn’t as necessary for this blend. It’s a little more resilient and doesn’t need to be planted as deep as other seeds.

Seed Contents: Forage rape, forage clover, tetraploid annual ryegrass

Coverage Area: ½ acre

Price: $34.99

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Maximize

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5 | Maximize

This is an awesome, versatile, warm-season blend of annuals. Planting this will help hold deer, turkey and other small game animals throughout spring, summer and early fall. It’s a great spring-planted option.

Seed Contents: Sunflowers, soybeans, cow peas and sorghum

Coverage Area: ¼ acre

Price: $19.99

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Pro Graze

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6 | Pro Graze

Want a great perennial blend? This one is high in crude protein. It’s also designed to be more palatable than most native forages. That means your deer herd will benefit more from it.

Seed Contents: White clover, forage rape, forage turnips, red clover and forage chicory

Coverage Area: ½ acre

Price: $29.99

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Provide Clover

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7 | Provide Clover

Clover is arguably the king of the food plot world. Deer love it. Hunters benefit from planting it. This mix of clover with chicory will be very beneficial for the deer herd and your hunt plans.

Seed Contents: Forage clover and forage chicory

Bag Size: 4 lbs.

Price: $29.99

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ShotPlot

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8 | ShotPlot

I’m a brassicas fan. They’re great for cooler climates. This annual forage attractant blend is very palatable for deer. In the right conditions, it has the potential to grow more than 24 inches in 45 days.

Seed Contents: Forage turnips and forage rape

Bag Size: 10 lbs.

Price: $45.99

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Throw ‘n’ Grow X-treme Oats

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9 | Throw ‘n’ Grow X-treme Oats

Don’t have heavy machinery? Don’t worry. This blend is designed for you. Use a leaf blower to remove leaves and small debris from the forest floor. Then use a garden tiller, weed eater or other small piece of equipment to expose the soil. Spread the seed and drive over it with a four wheeler, lawn mower (with blades turned off) or rake it into the soil.

Seed Contents: Red clover, forage oats, forage rape and tetraploid annual ryegrass

Bag Size: 5 lbs.

Price: $16.99

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WinterPZ

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10 | WinterPZ

This is a great cool-season food source. You can plant this in early spring, late summer or fall. It’s great for deer and should help pull them to your area.

Seed Contents: Winter peas, forage oats, red clover and forage triticale

Coverage Area: ¼ acre

Price: $21.99

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I haven’t always planted food plots. I hunted whitetails for about 15 years before I ever planted the first food plot. Did I kill deer back then without them? Sure I did. But am I willing to sacrifice the power of food plots now that I’ve experienced their value? Not a chance.

New Holland Workmaster 35/40 Compact T4B

New Holland

I’ve met and talked to a lot of people who swear food plots don’t do anything for them. To them I say they aren’t doing it right. When I first started planting food plots, I didn’t see much of a return. I wasn’t taking the right steps to plant a food plot. I wasn’t designing my food plots correctly. I wasn’t choosing the right seeds for my regional and specific location. I was just tossing some seed on the ground and waiting for it to grow.

Bonus Read: How to Plant a Food Plot

It’s important to plant food plots based on your goals. Always take the right steps to plant a successful food plot. Take soil samples. Spray weeds before breaking ground. Adequately work up the soil up. Optimize daylight usability by locating food plots close to quality bedding cover and water. Choose a shape that will help direct deer movement (U-, V-, T-, J-, L- or X-shaped food plots are best — use standing corn or Egyptian wheat to help create the shape). Also, choose a seed that will grow well in your area and that will mature during the period you will be hunting the most. Decide how much to plant. Lastly, choose something that the deer you hunt can’t get elsewhere, or at least supplement your plots with a blend of seeds.

Bonus Read: 5 Food Plots for Procrastinators

There’s a lot to keep in mind when planting food plots. But if you’re taking on the challenge this year, take a look at these 10 food plot seed options from Evolved and decide which one is right for you.