Stalking Muntjac and Land Management.

Ian Harford and Steve Wild Muntjac Stalking.

Today we follow Ian Harford and Steve Wild as they spend some quality time undertaking effective and sustainable deer and land management.

There's always plenty of work to accomplish, from cutting back tree branches, spotting in the high seat and maintaining food in the feeders to help the deer population flourish. 

Dense woodland makes stalking muntjac during the summer a very challenging prospect. On Today's episode of Great British Shooting, we follow Ian Harford and Steve Wild as they spend some quality time undertaking effective deer and land management.

Deer management, whether stalking and glassing in a high seat or topping up the feeders and cutting back branches. There's always work to be done in order to help develop and sustain a healthy population of deer.

Effective deer management is all about getting the balance right between establishing a strong and healthy herd of deer, whilst protecting the forestry and farming interests of the landowner. Effective deer management produces bigger deer and happy landowners!

The deer concession is home to a strong population of muntjac deer and a few roe deer. The dense woodland makes stalking muntjac during the summer a very challenging prospect. Muntjac are very small deer and travel beneath the canopy of the undergrowth.

The best time to undertake effective muntjac management is during the winter. The undergrowth dies down, offering greater visibility. The surrounding food sources become scarcer, which allows you to place feeders in strategic positions to draw in the deer and concentrate the population.

In the morning we follow Ian Harford in the high seat as he glasses the countryside to spot for muntjac deer. Following plenty of activity, Ian heads on foot to scan the surrounding area while Steve has successfully harvested a doe.

Of course with managing your own ground there's plenty of housekeeping to be done. The afternoon is spent filling up feeders with beans, cutting back tree branches before a second stint of glassing in the high seat.