Pig Hunting in Texas Photo Gallery

Images of Wild Hogs with How-To Tips

By
Bowhunt Pigs

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1 | Bowhunt Pigs

If a bowhunter stays in the shadows, he or she can take advantage of a pig’s poor eyesight and get close.

(Russell Graves text/photo)

Editor's note: Here are 5 reasons why you should hunt wild pigs.

 

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Shoot Small

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2 | Shoot Small

As a general eating rule, smaller pigs are better because of their superior-tasting meat.

(Russell Graves text/photo)

Editor's note: Check out Michael Pendley's Timber 2 Table recipe for Blackberry- and Chipotle-Glazed Wild Pig Ribs.

 

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Road Corn

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3 | Road Corn

Corn on the road is a surefire way to get pigs in the open.

Hunters in Texas put out a half-billion pounds a year. 

(Russell Graves text/photo)

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Pigs and AR Guns

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4 | Pigs and AR Guns

AR-style guns are effective tools for controlling feral pig populations.

(Russell Graves text/photo)

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Pigs Thrive

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5 | Pigs Thrive

While pigs love water, they also thrive in arid locations found in western Texas.

(Russell Graves text/photo)

Editor's note: Chances are you like pig hunting if you're clicking through this gallery. Ever hear about Hogzilla?

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Helicopter Hogs

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6 | Helicopter Hogs

In Texas, gunning from a helicopter is an effective way to take out lots of pigs in a short amount of time.

(Russell Graves text/photo)

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Pigs After Dark

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7 | Pigs After Dark

Once the sun goes down in the hotter months, pigs become more active.

(Russell Graves text/photo)

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Tusk Growth

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8 | Tusk Growth

A pig’s tusks never stop growing.

(Russell Graves text/photo)

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Mature Boar

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9 | Mature Boar

A mature boar will get a pig hunter's attention.

(Russell Graves text/photo)

Editor's note: You turkey hunters will be interested in this post.

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Mud Boar

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10 | Mud Boar

A boar that’s been bedded in mud.

(Russell Graves text/photo)

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Feeder Lights

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11 | Feeder Lights

Feeder lights are a great way to hunt hogs at night.

(Russell Graves text/photo)

 

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Property Damage

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12 | Property Damage

A broad piece of rangelands rooted by hogs.

(Russell Graves text/photo)

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Hogs and Cows

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13 | Hogs and Cows

Hogs often congregate with domestic livestock and eat feed provided to them by ranchers.

(Russell Graves text/photo)

Editor's note: Always be careful, cautious and safe when hunting wild pigs near cattle.

 

 

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Prolific Breeders

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14 | Prolific Breeders

Wild hogs are prolific breeders and mature sows can have a couple of litters a year.

(Russell Graves text/photo)

Editor's note: Ever see 39 feral hogs caught in one trap? You will now.

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Hogs and Deer

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15 | Hogs and Deer

While hogs and deer don’t compete for habitat directly, deer definitely try to steer clear of mature boars.

(Russell Graves text/photo)

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Grass Boar

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16 | Grass Boar

A mature boar cruising through the grass.

(Russell Graves text/photo)

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Fast Hogs

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17 | Fast Hogs

Hogs can run faster than a human.  

(Russell Graves text/photo)

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Elevated Perch

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18 | Elevated Perch

An elevated perch and a spotlight are effective tools for finding hogs at night.

(Russell Graves text/photo)

 

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Pigs: Small or Big Game?

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19 | Pigs: Small or Big Game?

Pigs have a good sense of smell, but can't see well.

Small or big game? Maybe it depends on the hog's size.

Go here for Realtree small game and big game hunting.

(Russell Graves photo)

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Pig Hunters

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20 | Pig Hunters

How, when, where and why do you like to hunt wild pigs? Let us know.

Please comment below.

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Editor's note: This Realtree.com post was first published July 17, 2016.

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Texas is fighting a war on wild pigs.

In barely more than a generation, the direct descendants of domesticated pigs have spread to nearly every county in the state. Along the way, this has unleashed carnage on the landscape accounting for nearly half a billion dollars a year in crop damage, loss of rangeland productivity, and municipal damage to places like public parks or golf courses.

Currently, biologists estimate the pig population to be somewhere around 2.5 million, but granted, that number is hard to pin down. Some reports say a whopping 750,000 animals are taken by Texas hunters each year, but that harvest rate is far too scant to even curb their expansion.

Biologists estimate that unless 70 percent of the animals are removed from the herd each year, pig numbers will continue to grow.

To combat the problem, Texas state game officials make it easy to hunt pigs. If you can access the land, any means and methods for killing feral hogs are acceptable.

Hunt them with a bow, rifle, from a helicopter, or at night – it's all legal in Texas.