Caul Fat-Wrapped Grilled Venison Tenderloin

Try something new, and a little exotic, for your next wild game dinner

By author of Timber 2 Table Wild Game Recipes Print Recipe
prep time
cook time
2-4
serves
3
ingredients
Easy
difficulty

Looking for the ultimate date night venison dinner for two? Then look no further than this grilled caul fat-wrapped venison tenderloin. Caul fat is the thin, fat netting that surrounds the stomach and other internal organs of some animals, including deer. It's perfect for pairing with delicate tenderloin because the fat melts as it cooks, leaving the finished product tender, juicy and flavorful. 

Serve the tenderloin over rice with a vegetable for a side.

The melted caul fat provides just about all the extra flavor you need for venison tenderloin, but a sprinkle of sea salt and a few grinds of fresh black pepper finish it off. I like to season the tenderloins first, then wrap in the caul fat.

To wrap, simply spread your caul fat out flat on a large cutting board, then use a sharp knife to cut out a section just large enough to completely wrap the tenderloins, with enough extra to overlap the edges so that the fat sticks to itself and seals in place.

I like to serve the meal with a nice rice pilaf or risotto and sautéed whole green beans.

Ingredients

2 venison tenderloins (the smaller inside loins)

1 large sheet of caul fat

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

Cooking Instructions

Start by pre-heating your Traeger grill to 350 degrees. Clean any bits of stuck-on fat or connective tissue from the tenderloins, and pat them dry with a clean paper towel.

Season on all sides with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Lay the sheet of caul fat out flat on a cutting board, and use a sharp knife to cut out a section a bit longer than the tenderloins and about three times as wide.

Season the tenderloins with salt and cracked black pepper, then wrap tightly in caul fat.

Lay one tenderloin on the trimmed caul fat and wrap tightly, overlapping the fat onto itself and pressing so that it sticks together. Repeat the process with the remaining tenderloin.

Depending on the thickness of the tenderloin, grill the venison for 9 to 11 minutes, rotating once, for a medium-rare finish. If you use an instant-read thermometer, shoot for 130 degrees or so in the center of the thickest part. Adjust time and finished temperature up or down, depending on how you prefer your venison doneness.

Grill the tenderloins to your desired degree of doneness.

Let the tenderloins rest, loosely tented with foil, for 5 to 10 minutes before slicing and serving.

Rest the tenderloins, then slice into thin medallions.

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