Scenes from Turkey Hunting Camp

By

Photos from Bill Konway's Kentucky Turkey Season

A Good Burger

Image 1 of 11

1 | A Good Burger

I've come to appreciate a good burger or meal on the drive to camp, being as I'll be mostly eating my own cooking for the next several weeks.

(Bill Konway photo)

Image 1 of 11

Sighted-In

Image 2 of 11

2 | Sighted-In

A few shots to be certain nothing has changed significantly from last year is one of the first things I do after getting settled in. The drawback to getting sighted-in is it takes away a couple good excuses if I happen to miss.

(Bill Konway photo)

Image 2 of 11

Scouting

Image 3 of 11

3 | Scouting

Once the season rolls around, there's no telling where the birds will show up as they get bounced around from farm to farm. Using the terrain and existing buildings to your advantage can sometimes help.

(Bill Konway photo)

Image 3 of 11

Great Light

Image 4 of 11

4 | Great Light

There's always some work to be done for various clients during the season, and it usually involves turkey gear or turkey hunting, surprisingly enough. Great light and the landscape make this area one of my favorites to shoot in.

(Bill Konway photo)

Image 4 of 11

Food Plots

Image 5 of 11

5 | Food Plots

Prepping ground and planting food plots is also going on before, during and after the season. In this case, it's about 5 acres of clover getting ready to be broadcast.

(Bill Konway photo)

Image 5 of 11

Grilling

Image 6 of 11

6 | Grilling

While waiting for that first bird to be taken, the Traeger takes the brunt of the cooking responsibilities. A nice brisket can last a couple days when friends are in.

(Bill Konway photo)

Image 6 of 11

Bearded Hen

Image 7 of 11

7 | Bearded Hen

Sometimes you get a surprise in camp. In this case, my buddy John Bond returned to camp with a bearded hen.

Editor's note: Taking a bearded hen is legal in Kentucky.

(Bill Konway photo)

Image 7 of 11

Photo Bird

Image 8 of 11

8 | Photo Bird

Even a blind squirrel finds a nut now and again! Thanks to some great calling by a friend, Brandon Phipps, I managed to get a really decent bird. He also clicked this pic for me.

(Bill Konway photo)

 

Image 8 of 11

Photo Prep

Image 9 of 11

9 | Photo Prep

Friend Ashley Phipps prepares her great tom she took, for a few pix at the old barn at my place.

(Bill Konway photo)

Image 9 of 11

All Smiles

Image 10 of 11

10 | All Smiles

It's all smiles when you're getting your picture taken with a great bird!

(Bill Konway photo)

Image 10 of 11

Beautiful Scene

Image 11 of 11

11 | Beautiful Scene

 I can never get enough of scenes like these.​

(Bill Konway photo)

Go here for more Realtree turkey hunting. Follow us on Facebook.

Image 11 of 11

Each spring I look forward to getting to our farm in eastern Kentucky and chasing the turkeys that have been teasing me for months, and enjoying good times with friends who drop in: some for a meal; others for a couple days of hunting.

Each year is different, but each year brings a tremendous amount of happiness, just not always because of a dead turkey.

It almost seems like most years I’m ending the season empty-handed in terms of birds, but tagged-out on tales and memories. This year, however, I did manage to kill a good bird, with a lot of help from a friend that actually knows what he’s doing.

(Check out this photo gallery for scenes from turkey hunting camp.)