The Grand Slam: Osceola Hunt

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1 | Tall Tine Outfitters

These shots were taken in late March at Tall Tine Outfitters. The hunter is also the outfitter, Ted Jaycox.

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2 | Florida Weather

It was ridiculously hot and the bugs were terrible—but that’s typical weather for hunting Osceolas.

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3 | Hen

We had turkeys all around us every day. They were vocal on the roost, then they’d go silent for a while.

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4 | Midday Action

But, like turkeys often do, they’d usually be ready to play ball again by midday.

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5 | Easter Miracle

We had a couple close calls the first two days, but couldn’t seal the deal. Two full days of turkey hunting is exhausting, so I prayed for an Easter Miracle.

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6 | Easter Sunday Gobbler

At 7 p.m. on Easter Sunday, we got it when we intercepted a lone longbeard making his way across a big field. 

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7 | Limbhanger He was making a beeline for a stand of pines, no doubt on his way to roost. We gave him a few clucks and yelps… - See more at: http://www.realtree.com/hunting/articles-and-how-to/grand-slam-osceola-hunt/limbhanger#sthash.QhBJHH6X.dpuf

He was making a beeline for a stand of pines, no doubt on his way to roost. We gave him a few clucks and yelps…

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8 | Victory Lap

…and a 3-inch load of No. 5s took him down.

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9 | Custom Box Call

We worked the bird with Ted’s custom box call, made nearly 25 years ago by Dick Kirby. It sounds as sweet today as it ever did. 

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10 | Turkeys Everywhere

After the hunt, I had the opportunity to just photograph some turkeys. As usual, they were much more cooperative than the birds we’d hunted just a day before. Seems like once your hunt is over, birds are everywhere—such is turkey hunting.

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South Florida in March is the first leg of most Grand Slam hunts—and perhaps the most difficult