Food Plots and Land Management Articles

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Food Plot Seed: How to Plant Buckwheat

This warm-season annual is a great food plot seed option for most hunters. It isn’t a legume or grain species. It's a forb and it can grow as tall as 4 to 5 feet in height. Crude protein levels are high, often surpassing 20 percent. Deer, turkey, waterfowl, upland birds...


Food Plot Seed: How to Plant Beets

While it isn’t common knowledge, beets are big in the United States. They comprise a large portion of our agricultural output each year. They’re grown for many different uses. But our favorite use is for drawing in and feeding white-tailed deer. The high level of sugar (upward of 20 percent...


Food Plot Seed: How to Plant Winter Peas

Winter peas. Both deer and deer hunters love them. They’re nutritious for deer and are a great draw during most of the season. It provides hunting opportunities and helps provide needed nutrition when food sources are oftentimes limited the most. This annual legume is a cool-season plant that’s high in...


How to Deal with Food Plot Pests

We usually point to things like fertilizer, weather, soil types and timing of plantings when we are considering if our food plots will thrive. But there are factors working behind the scenes that can cause damage to your food plots. Critters large and small use these plots and some of...


Food Plot Seed: How to Plant Alfalfa

Alfalfa. Deer love it. But when it comes to planting and growing the stuff, it isn’t for the faint of heart. (It’s difficult to keep alive.) That said, this plant is a perennial. If established well and properly kept up, it can last as long as three to five years...


What to Plant in a Half-Acre Food Plot

Most whitetail hunters do not hunt massive tracts of land with pristine hidey-hole food plots at every possible location. In my experience, half-acre plots are common and allow for the perfect mix of feeding and hunting. Assuming your spot has four to six hours of sunlight, proper soil PH and...


Food Plot Seed: How to Plant Chicory

This food plot seed option is a solid food source for deer and other wildlife. This perennial is attractive forage, especially during the early season. It’s highly digestible and is a favorite among whitetails. It contains approximately 28 to 30 percent protein. It also has calcium, magnesium, potassium, sulfur and...


Enhance Soil Microflora to Improve Your Food Plots

With fertilizer costs on the rise, it is tempting for landowners to skip fertilizing their food plots this fall and assume that soil nutrients are adequate. As long as the soil has ample residual nutrients for the next planting, skipping fertilizer won't hurt. But testing the soil in food plots...


Food Plot Seed: How to Plant Oats

Oats. Come fall and winter, it’s what’s for dinner. This cool-season food source is extremely attractive during colder late-fall and winter days. This is an excellent choice for deer hunters who like to plant cereal grains. This plant species is very high in carbohydrates — which is what helps deer...


Food Plot Seed: How to Plant Radishes

Radishes are part of the brassicas family along with turnips, canola and rapeseed. It’s a very popular food-plot choice throughout most of the country and deer gravitate to it where it’s available. This food-plot seed variety is a very good option for most deer hunters. Like most brassicas, radishes are...


Food Plot Seed: How to Plant Turnips

As an avid food plotter, I’m a fan of many different plant species. I get all too excited about what I plan to plant each year. Might even be a little fruity about it. But hey, it’s muh passion, brah. All jokes aside, turnips rank high on that list. As...


Food Plot Seed: How to Plant White Clover

White clover just might be one of the best all-around legume food sources for deer. It’s highly nutritious, fairly hardy, and is often overlooked due to other clover variety options. Nonetheless, white clover has earned its spot in the world of food plots. This high-protein seed option requires less maintenance...


10 Things to Use as Food Plot Screens

There was one particular food plot deer always used in daylight. The rest of my food plots looked like a vacant motel scene. But I couldn’t quite figure out why this one particular food plot produced so much daytime action. What did that one have that the others didn’t? All...


Food Plot Seed: How to Plant Sunflowers

Food plots serve as a big part of what I do each season. They can be used to feed deer. They can be used to kill deer. It all depends on location, orientation and design. But one thing remains constant regardless of the purpose of the plot: You need the...


Food Plot Seed: How to Plant Red Clover

Red. White. Crimson. Ladino. Alsike. Zigzag. Trifolium. And more. There are many varieties of clover you can plant. So, which one is best? Well, I’m not going to say red clover reigns supreme. But it reigns supreme. At least, it’s my personal favorite (best or not). Red clover, also referred...


Managing Native Vegetation Alongside Food Plots for Whitetails

For many years hunters and outdoor enthusiasts have planted food plots to improve the nutrition available to their deer herd and increase their chances of harvesting a quality buck. While this is a good practice, food plots typically represent only 1 to 5 percent of the available habitat on most...


10 Steps to Successfully Planting Trees for Deer

Trees are an important aspect of a whitetail’s diet. It doesn’t matter where you go in their range — trees play a role. Both soft and hard mast trees provide food for deer. Even trees that don’t produce a viable fruit or nut are oftentimes targeted for the leafy and...


8 Steps to the Perfect Food Plot

Deer management has been a steadily growing trend over the years. There is no doubt that today's hunter is more informed, and more knowledgeable about his or her quarry than ever before. In fact, most deer hunters today would rather discuss buck-to-doe ratios, age structure, and the importance of scent...


Food Plot Seed: How to Plant Cowpeas

Cowpeas originated from Africa and have been grown in the United States for several centuries. But even though they aren't new to the New World, they are the new craze in the food plot world. Everybody is planting them, and a lot of deer are eating them. And for good...


Food Plot Seed: How to Plant Grain Sorghum

Grain sorghum (similar to milo) isn’t a popular choice for most modern food plotters. It’s extremely underrated, though — especially if you want to attract multiple species of wildlife such as turkey, quail, dove, etc. It’s important to note there are two slightly different varieties — milo sorghum alum. Sorghum...


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