Northeast Region Turkey Hunting Forecast

By author of Turkey Blog with Steve Hickoff

Visiting turkey hunters might be pleasantly surprised by what this part of the country offers

Unlike some regions, northern New England turkey numbers are stable or increasing. Image by Kerry B. Wix

Maine

Eating steamed lobster with melted butter, trout fishing, and a menu of other recreational activities are bonuses here. That’s all a big upside for visiting hunters.

And the cost of turkey hunting in Maine for both the resident and the nonresident is among the most affordable in the country, especially if visitors opt for the three-day small-game license and turkey permit.

[Read More: Turkey Hunting in Maine]

New Hampshire

New Hampshire, as with neighboring Vermont and Maine, offers quality turkey hunting. Turkey population trends have increased steadily since the late 1980s. Overall estimates are up to 50,000 now.

Total land area open to our spring tradition is good to excellent throughout the Granite State, and widespread.

[Read More: Turkey Hunting in New Hampshire]

Vermont

As with New Hampshire and Maine, this northern New England state is hunter friendly and holds good numbers of turkeys.

And the Green Mountain State has widespread public lands open to chasing our greatest game bird.

[Read More: Turkey Hunting in Vermont]

Massachusetts

There are really two regions of Massachusetts: the more rural and rugged western half of the state, and the urban sprawl to the east.

I bet you know where the best turkey hunting is located.

[Read More: Turkey Hunting in Massachusetts]

Connecticut

This southern New England state is a mix of increasing suburban development with some forested areas holding birds you can hunt. Hunting pressure is low. Public-land access is limited. Wildlife management challenges are many.

That said, the bag limit is five turkeys (yep, you read that right).

[Read More: Turkey Hunting in Connecticut]

Rhode Island

Hunt Rhode Island if you want your six-state New England Slam, and if you have friends or relatives there with private land, as this is where hunters will find some birds. 

Otherwise, the smallest state in the Union (1,045 square miles) offers only limited opportunities. 

[Read More: Turkey Hunting in Rhode Island]

New York

On the upside, New York offers vast public lands, wildlife management areas, state forests, and landowners willing to offer access (18.6 million forested acres).

However, wild turkey numbers and poult production have been on a downward trend, with the last several hatch years offering no change in this direction.

[Read More: Turkey Hunting in New York]

Pennsylvania

Wear camouflage to a roadside diner during spring turkey season, and chances are someone with a smile on their face will ask if you managed to kill a bird.

I know. I was born and raised in Pennsylvania turkey country.

[Read More: Turkey Hunting in Pennsylvania]

New Jersey

New Jersey is the most densely populated state in the country (1,210 residents per square mile).

Even the state’s estimated turkey population is up slightly from our last update, a positive trend.

[Read More: Turkey Hunting in New Jersey]

What makes Realtree.com the best online resource for turkey hunters? See for yourself.