Turkey Taxidermy Photo Gallery from the 2017 NWTF Convention

By author of Turkey Blog with Steve Hickoff

Cool Wild Turkey Mounts

Wild turkey taxidermy recreates the scenes you remember from your hunts in mounted birds. If done well, the moment lives on forever on your wall or floor-mounted displays. Taxidermists are true artists, and their work is honored each year at the NWTF Convention.

Check out this photo blog gallery, and some of the turkey mounts from the recent event. And maybe you'll even get some ideas for your next turkey taxidermy mount.

NWTF Convention 2017 winners are listed in the last frame of this click-through gallery.

Half StrutHalf StrutHalf StrutHalf StrutHalf Strut

Image 1 of 9

Image 1 of 9

1 | Half Strut

You've caught a glimpse of this gobbler while hunting. The half strut can mean a number of things: the longbeard has seen a hen, and is about to pop into strut to get some attention. That dominant bird might also have caught a glimpse of trouble, and is about to make some decisions on getting out of there – and fast.

Check out the next turkey mount by clicking the arrow to the right of the photo.

(Steve Hickoff photo)

The GobbleThe GobbleThe GobbleThe GobbleThe Gobble

Image 2 of 9

Image 2 of 9

2 | The Gobble

This mature male bird is out looking for company and declaring his dominance over the habitat he stalks.

You can almost hear the gobble booming out of this longbeard.

(Steve Hickoff photo)

Full StrutFull StrutFull StrutFull StrutFull Strut

Image 3 of 9

Image 3 of 9

3 | Full Strut

If you're a turkey hunter, this scene in the wild will send a chill up the back of your neck and raise the hair on your forearms. We love it and live for it, this view of a gobbler all puffed out.

Look at the size of that striker!

(Steve Hickoff photo)

Bearded HenBearded HenBearded HenBearded HenBearded Hen

Image 4 of 9

Image 4 of 9

4 | Bearded Hen

In some states, bearded spring hens are legal.

It's the subject of debate for some turkey hunters, as female birds with beards (much less common than gobblers) breed and lay eggs like other hens. Others may take a bearded lady like this if it's legal in the state they're hunting.

Either way, beautiful mount.

(Steve Hickoff photo)

Gobbler ComingGobbler ComingGobbler ComingGobbler ComingGobbler Coming

Image 5 of 9

Image 5 of 9

5 | Gobbler Coming

This longbeard is coming to your calls, full of curiosity.

And yes, full disclosure as turkey hunters well know, it might also be leaving the scene if danger is perceived. 

(Steve Hickoff photo)

Cautious StruttCautious StruttCautious StruttCautious StruttCautious Strutt

Image 6 of 9

Image 6 of 9

6 | Cautious Strutter

Spring gobblers are as paranoid as they come, but also driven to find and breed hens.

This guys looks like its tip-toeing in, but indicating interest to all turkey hens nearby.

(Steve Hickoff photo)

Dead MountDead MountDead MountDead MountDead Mount

Image 7 of 9

Image 7 of 9

7 | Dead Mount

Check out the cool feathering on this gobbler dead mount.

(Steve Hickoff photo)

Two LongbeardsTwo LongbeardsTwo LongbeardsTwo LongbeardsTwo Longbeards

Image 8 of 9

Image 8 of 9

8 | Two Longbeards

Okay, make a decision, which one will you shoot?

Now wait for separation and pull the trigger.

(Steve Hickoff photo)

ShooterShooterShooterShooterShooter

Image 9 of 9

Image 9 of 9

9 | Shooter

Get this gobbler in range, cluck once or twice to get its head up, then shoot at the thick base of that throaty periscope of a neck for the best overall killing zone.

(Steve Hickoff photo)

Read the 2017 Grand National Taxidermy Contest Results.

Find more Realtree turkey hunting here. Follow us on Facebook.