North American Super Slam: 29 Big Game Animals You Need

Would You Do This If Money Wasn’t a Factor?

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White-Tailed DeerWhite-Tailed DeerWhite-Tailed DeerWhite-Tailed DeerWhite-Tailed Deer

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1 | White-Tailed Deer

This is the “easy” one. (But they're in no way easy to hunt or kill.) The white-tailed deer is the most common and hunted big game animal in North America. Mature bucks in the South weigh as little as 100 to 125 pounds and bucks in the North can weigh upward of 300 pounds. Antler sizes range in scope as well.

Click here for more information on the white-tailed deer.

Photo credit: Images on the Wildside

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Mule DeerMule DeerMule DeerMule DeerMule Deer

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2 | Mule Deer

This is the larger cousin to the white-tailed deer. Mature mule deer weigh from 150 to 400 pounds. Interestingly enough, mule deer’ and whitetails’ ranges commonly overlap. Therefore, with the right tags, you can often tag a mule deer and whitetail relatively close to one another. It’s mostly found in the Midwest, further west and northward into Canada.

Click here for more information on the mule deer.

Photo credit: Images on the Wildside

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Coues White-Tailed DeerCoues White-Tailed DeerCoues White-Tailed DeerCoues White-Tailed DeerCoues White-Tailed Deer

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3 | Coues White-Tailed Deer

This is the whitetail's little cousin. It weighs significantly less and is found in Arizona, New Mexico and Mexico. It sports much smaller antlers, too. It’s range overlaps minimally with whitetails.

Click here for more information on the Coues white-tailed deer.

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Columbia Black-Tailed DeerColumbia Black-Tailed DeerColumbia Black-Tailed DeerColumbia Black-Tailed DeerColumbia Black-Tailed Deer

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4 | Columbia Black-Tailed Deer

This critter is more elusive than the larger members of the deer family. They can be found up and down the West Coast. Ultimately, they look like a mule deer, only much smaller. In contrast to the whitetail, it gets its name from the dark-colored tip on end of its rear. They range from 150 to 200 pounds at maturity and have fairly small antlers.

Click here for more information on the Columbia blacktail.

Photo credit: Steve Kane

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Sitka Black-Tailed DeerSitka Black-Tailed DeerSitka Black-Tailed DeerSitka Black-Tailed DeerSitka Black-Tailed Deer

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5 | Sitka Black-Tailed Deer

Still need the Sitka? This deer is even more elusive than the Columbia blacktail. The Sitka is found in the coastal regions of western Canada and southwestern Alaska. These deer weigh approximately 150 to 175 pounds at maturity and grow fairly small antlers compared to the other subspecies of deer.

Click here for more information on the Sitka blacktail.

Photo credit: Joe Bell

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Rocky Mountain ElkRocky Mountain ElkRocky Mountain ElkRocky Mountain ElkRocky Mountain Elk

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6 | Rocky Mountain Elk

Who doesn’t love the elk? The Rocky Mountain subspecies is somewhat smaller than its Roosevelt cousin, but antlers are generally longer. Mature bulls can way upward of 900 pounds and are typically very aggressive during the rut. They’re common throughout the western states and even some eastern states.

Click here for more information on the Rocky Mountain elk.

Photo credit: John Hafner

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Roosevelt ElkRoosevelt ElkRoosevelt ElkRoosevelt ElkRoosevelt Elk

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7 | Roosevelt Elk

You can find the “Rosie” in Washington, Oregon and parts of Canada. They’ve also been released in Alaska. Mature males can weigh more than 1,000 pounds and their antler typically crown somewhere near the end of the beam.

Click here for more information on the Roosevelt elk.

Photo credit: Gregg Ritz

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Tule ElkTule ElkTule ElkTule ElkTule Elk

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8 | Tule Elk

The Tule is the least common of the three elk subspecies. They are far fewer in number than they once were and can only be found in California. They’re much smaller in weight and antler size than the Rocky Mountain and Roosevelt elk. Killing one of these is a significant achievement.

Click here for more information on the Tule elk.

Photo credit: Stephen G/Wikimedia Commons

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Canada MooseCanada MooseCanada MooseCanada MooseCanada Moose

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9 | Canada Moose

Weighing approximately 1,500 pounds, this is the third largest mammal in North America. Only the Alaskan Yukon moose and American bison are bigger. It ranges across each of the Canadian provinces and several northern U.S. states.

Click here for more information on the Canada moose.

Photo credit: Archer’s Choice Media

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Shiras MooseShiras MooseShiras MooseShiras MooseShiras Moose

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10 | Shiras Moose

The Shiras is the smallest of the three North American moose subspecies. It also boasts smaller antlers. And its pale-colored saddle is a staple of this animal. It’s found in Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, Idaho, Montana, Washington and southern Alberta.

Click here for more information on the Shiras moose.

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Alaska Yukon MooseAlaska Yukon MooseAlaska Yukon MooseAlaska Yukon MooseAlaska Yukon Moose

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11 | Alaska Yukon Moose

The Yukon moose wins the heavyweight award. They tip the scales at more than 1,800 pounds. It’s the second largest animal in North America and can only be found in northwestern Canada and Alaska.

Click here for more information on the Alaska Yukon moose.

Photo credit: Tom Tietz/Shutterstock

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Barren Ground CaribouBarren Ground CaribouBarren Ground CaribouBarren Ground CaribouBarren Ground Caribou

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12 | Barren Ground Caribou

The barren ground caribou lives in northwestern Canada and Alaska. A typical herd can be upward of 100,000 strong and can migrate hundreds of miles in a year. They are fairly large in size, ranging from 400 to more than 500 pounds.

Click here for more information on the barren ground caribou.

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Central Canadian Barren Ground CaribouCentral Canadian Barren Ground CaribouCentral Canadian Barren Ground CaribouCentral Canadian Barren Ground CaribouCentral Canadian Barren Ground Caribou

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13 | Central Canadian Barren Ground Caribou

You’ll find the Central Canadian barren ground caribou in the tundra in north central Canada. These vary in size, weighing anywhere from 225 to 475 pounds. They tend to score less than their mountain and barren ground cousins.

Click here for more information on the Central Canadian barren ground caribou.

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Woodland CaribouWoodland CaribouWoodland CaribouWoodland CaribouWoodland Caribou

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14 | Woodland Caribou

The woodland caribou is found in central and eastern Canada. These generally weigh 325 to 450 pounds and have the smallest antlers of all caribou except for those residing in the arctic islands. Also, they don’t migrate quite as far as other caribou.

Click here for more information on the woodland caribou.

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Mountain CaribouMountain CaribouMountain CaribouMountain CaribouMountain Caribou

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15 | Mountain Caribou

The mountain caribou is the heaviest of the five subspecies. It can weigh as much as 600 pounds. They also sport fairly large antlers. Herds are generally smaller. They’re found in western Canada and northwestern parts of the United States.

Click here for more information on the mountain caribou.

Photo credit: Super Slam Club/Ovis/Eddy Dankers

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Quebec Labrador CaribouQuebec Labrador CaribouQuebec Labrador CaribouQuebec Labrador CaribouQuebec Labrador Caribou

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16 | Quebec Labrador Caribou

This subspecies generally weighs in at about 325 to 450 pounds. Currently, they are not doing well and numbers are lower than normal. They are highly migratory and only inhabit northeastern Canada.

Click here for more information on the Quebec Labrador caribou.

Photo credit: Super Slam Club/Ovis/Tom Miranda

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Polar BearPolar BearPolar BearPolar BearPolar Bear

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17 | Polar Bear

This is the biggest of the bear subspecies. It lives in the arctic and lives on both ice and land. Populations are the densest around coastal areas. Adult males can weigh upward of 1,000 pounds.

Click here for more information on the polar bear.

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Alaska Brown BearAlaska Brown BearAlaska Brown BearAlaska Brown BearAlaska Brown Bear

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18 | Alaska Brown Bear

The Alaska brown bear resides in Alaska and southward along the Canada coast. This bad boy is generally a light brown to chocolate color and can weigh 750 to 1,000 pounds. Other than the polar bear, it’s the largest land carnivore in the world.

Click here for more information on the Alaska brown bear.

Photo credit: Tony Campbell/Shutterstock

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Grizzly BearGrizzly BearGrizzly BearGrizzly BearGrizzly Bear

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19 | Grizzly Bear

Other than the black bear, the grizzly is one of the smartest and most adaptable of the bear subspecies. You can find them in Alaska, western Canada and northwestern U.S. It doesn’t see well, but it has a very good nose, and can run upward of 30 mph. These bears weigh anywhere from 500 to 800 pounds.

Click here for more information on the grizzly bear.

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Black BearBlack BearBlack BearBlack BearBlack Bear

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20 | Black Bear

This is by far the most adaptable bear subspecies. It’s found in more than 35 U.S. states, Canada and parts of Mexico. Adult males can weigh more than 500 pounds, but in southern climates where bears need not hibernate, some are reaching weights of more than 700 pounds.

Click here for more information on the black bear.

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CougarCougarCougarCougarCougar

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21 | Cougar

This is perhaps the best hunter of all the big game carnivores. Its stealth is unparalleled. Like the black bear, it’s extremely adaptable. It’s been found in Canada, Mexico and more than 30 U.S. states. Male cats can weight 100 to 175 pounds.

Click here for more information on the cougar.

Photo credit: Warren Metcalf/Shutterstock

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MuskoxMuskoxMuskoxMuskoxMuskox

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22 | Muskox

This hairy critter lives in northern Canada in the coastal regions. They do move inland, but seem to stay relatively close to the bay. It gets its name from the odor it puts off. Its hair is longer than that of any other animal. Big males can weigh 700 to 750 pounds.

Click here for more information on the muskox.

Photo credit: Simon Schacherl/Shutterstock

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BisonBisonBisonBisonBison

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23 | Bison

The bison lives mostly on the open prairie. Big males can weigh more than 2,000 pounds. You can find these in Mexico, Canada and the U.S.

Click here for more information on the bison.

Photo credit: Lorraine Logan/Shutterstock

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American Mountain GoatAmerican Mountain GoatAmerican Mountain GoatAmerican Mountain GoatAmerican Mountain Goat

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24 | American Mountain Goat

The mountain goat resides in northwestern U.S. and western Canada. Populations also extend up into Alaska. A big male goat will weigh anywhere from 225 to 300 pound. These goats don’t fight like sheep. Instead of going head-to-head, they fight head-to-rump.

Click here for more information on the mountain goat.

Photo credit: Dr. Alan Lipkin/Shutterstock

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PronghornPronghornPronghornPronghornPronghorn

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25 | Pronghorn

Ah, now to the speed goat. This species lives throughout the western half of the United States and northward into southern Canada. An adult male will weigh approximately 120 to 130 pounds. They can run 40 to 50 mph for miles on end and sprint at speeds up to 60 mph.

Click here for more information on the pronghorn.

Photo credit: Paul Tessier/Shutterstock

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Rocky Mountain Bighorn SheepRocky Mountain Bighorn SheepRocky Mountain Bighorn SheepRocky Mountain Bighorn SheepRocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep

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26 | Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep

The icon of sheep country. This is what most people think about when they think about sheep. Big bad Rocky Mountain bighorns raising up on hind legs and pile driving each other in the head. Tough stuff. These can be found all along the Rocky Mountains and into southern Alberta and British Columbia. Mature rams will weigh between 200 and 300 pounds. You may also substitute the California bighorn to fulfill this part of the sheep requirement.

Click here to learn more about the Rocky Mountain bighorn and its range.

Photo credit: Shutterstock/Dr. Alan Lipkin

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Dall SheepDall SheepDall SheepDall SheepDall Sheep

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27 | Dall Sheep

You’re going to have to travel to kill one of these critters. The beautiful, white Dall sheep calls Alaskan mountains, northern Yukon, northwestern British Columbia, and the Mackenzie Mountains home. Dall sheep can vary in size and weight. Horns are slenderer and longer than other subspecies of sheep.

Click here to learn more about the Dall sheep.

Photo credit: Shutterstock/David Hoffmann

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Desert Bighorn SheepDesert Bighorn SheepDesert Bighorn SheepDesert Bighorn SheepDesert Bighorn Sheep

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28 | Desert Bighorn Sheep

You’ll find the desert bighorn in desert mountain ranges. Hence the name. The subspecies is known for its abilities to go days without water. These can be found in California, Arizona, Nevada, Colorado, Texas, Utah and New Mexico. They’re also found in North Baja, South Baja, Coahuila, Chihuahua and Sonora. Size varies with the habitat, but these sheep tend to be smaller than their high-mountain cousins.

Click here to learn more about the desert bighorn sheep.

Photo credit: Shutterstock/Tom Tietz

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Stone SheepStone SheepStone SheepStone SheepStone Sheep

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29 | Stone Sheep

The stone sheep is found in northern British Columbia and southern portions of the Yukon. They inhabit mostly alpine and glacial regions, yet below the permanent snow line. They often feed in the meadows. They vary in color and is very similar to the Fannin sheep. Mature rams generally weigh around 200 pounds.

Click here to learn more about the stone sheep.

Photo credit: Images on the Wildside

Editor’s note: Super Slam® is a registered trademark of Grand Slam Club/Ovis used with permission. This was originally published March 23, 2017.

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For me, the true meaning of hunting is for food and adventure. It’s for sustenance of both the body and mind. And chasing big game animals has been a very large part of many lives across the world. Thus the Super Slam® of North American Big Game was born.

Grand Slam Club/Ovis (GSCO) is the official archive of the Super Slam of North American big game. They house the records and maintain records keeping. Contact GSCO to register animals you harvest.

I’ve never attempted the slam. Probably never will. It's a big thing. This feat takes years and serious dedication to achieve. Few try it. Even fewer obtain it. However, there are smaller slams you can attempt. But here are all of the animals needed to complete the ultimate quest. Think you have it in you?

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